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Journalism
Broadcast Journalism                       Print Journalism
What is Broadcast Journalism?
Broadcast journalism is the practice of the communication of news by electrical methods such as radio, television, and the Internet. These electronic media disperse pictures, visual text, and/or sounds. 
 
Backed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, broadcast journalism promises to provide citizens with useful information about public issues and be a watchdog on powerful institutions, including government and business.
 
Activities for broadcast journalism include filming, writing copy for broadcast and radio, reporting the news, and editing copy or news footage.

What skills do I need to have a career in Broadcast Journalism?

You must have an interest in current affairs and excellent verbal and written communication skills. 
 
Broadcast journalism requires strong editorial judgement and organizational skills, with a first class news awareness and judgement. Other skills include:
  • Editing skills 
  • People skills 
  • Multitasking 
  • Problem solving & decision-making
  • Ability to adhere to tight deadlines 
  • Analytical skills

What can I do with a concentration in Broadcast Journalism?

A concentration in broadcast journalism can lead to careers where you report, produce, and deliver the news for radio, television, and other broadcast media.
 
With a concentration in broadcast journalism, you could report the local news pressing mayoral candidates to find out what they really think, or become a sports announcer on a local radio station.  The broadcast journalism major is also for people who’d rather be behind the camera operating microphones, recording equipment, and other devices, and could go on to edit, produce, or direct the news.

Career titles:

  • Producer
  • Video editor
  • Announcer
  • Director


  • Reporter
  • News Analyst
  • Radio operator

In brief, the department’s commitment to a broad-based study of communication activities permits a more intelligent choice of career fields. In addition, it provides a more meaningful classroom experience during the junior and senior years.  The requirements listed below are for the catalog year 2015–2016.  For other years, please consult the USA Bulletin.

All general education requirements can be found on the College of Arts and Sciences website.

Requirements for a Major in Communication:

Communication majors must complete CA 110, Public Speaking and 42 hours in one of the department's five tracks listed below. At least five communication classes must be numbered 300 or higher and must be taken at USA. Only three hours of credit from CA 394 or CA 494 can be used to satisfy this requirement.

Specific Course Requirements:

Students in the journalism track choose between print -- newspapers, magazines and newsletters -- and broadcast news, but also receive cross-training to provide them with as broad a range of skills as possible within the confines of an academic degree. At least 72 hours in courses outside the Department of Communication are required.

  • Core Requirements: CA 101, CA 220-W, CA 260, CA 300, CA 445
  • Required for both Print and Broadcast: CA 350, CA 370-W, CA 455
  • Also Required: CA 250, CA 450, CA 451, CA 452 
  • Choose Two: CA 288, CA 382, CA 482, CA 496

Four Year Advising Plans:


What is Print Journalism?

Print journalism is the practice of investigating and reporting events, issues and trends to a broad audience and relaying information via text in newspapers, magazines, and the Internet.
 
Backed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, print journalism promises to provide citizens with useful information about public issues and be a watchdog on powerful institutions, including government and business.
 
Activities for print journalism include writing copy, editing copy, photojournalism, managing a newspaper or magazine, and working as a correspondent.

What skills do I need to have a career in Print Journalism?

You must have effective written, oral and visual communication abilities. 
 
Print journalism requires the ability to accurately present information and work under the pressure of deadlines. Other skills include:  
  • Verbal and written communication skills
  • Word processing, computer graphics and desktop publishing skills
  • Research and information-gathering skills
  • Editing and design skills
  • Interviewing and people skills 
  • Time management skills

What can I do with a concentration in Print Journalism?

A concentration in print journalism prepares students for a wide variety of job opportunities in business, education, government and the non-profit sector.
 
A concentration in print journalism can prepare students to work directly in news careers or in public relations, advertising and publishing. The concentration is also an excellent background for graduate work in a many fields including law and administration.

Career titles:

  • Editor in chief
  • Managing editor
  • Section head
  • Writer


  • Editor
  • Correspondent
  • Magazine Editor

In brief, the department’s commitment to a broad-based study of communication activities permits a more intelligent choice of career fields. In addition, it provides a more meaningful classroom experience during the junior and senior years.  The requirements listed below are for the catalog year 2015–2016.  For other years, please consult the USA Bulletin.

Requirements for a Major in Communication:

Communication majors must complete CA 110, Public Speaking and 42 hours in one of the department's five tracks listed below. At least five communication classes must be numbered 300 or higher and must be taken at USA. Only three hours of credit from CA 394 or CA 494 can be used to satisfy this requirement.

All general education requirements can be found on the College of Arts and Sciences website.

Specific Course Requirements:

Students in the journalism track choose between print -- newspapers, magazines and newsletters -- and broadcast news, but also receive cross-training to provide them with as broad a range of skills as possible within the confines of an academic degree. At least 72 hours in courses outside the Department of Communication are required.

  • Core requirements: CA 101, CA 220-W, CA 260, CA 300, CA 445
  • Required for both Print and Broadcast: CA 350, CA 370-W, CA 455,
  • Also Required: CA 281, CA 382, CA 385 or CA 387, CA 472/482
  • Choose Two: CA 288, CA 481-W, CA 496

Four Year Advising Plans: